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Belgian DEME group, specializing in dredging and marine engineering, has attempted to seize a vessel being built at the financially-troubled shipyard LaNaval.


As confirmed to OW by the company’s spokesperson, DEME has hired sub-contractors to take control of the uncompleted cable laying and trenching vessel Living Stone after several delays in delivery by the Spanish yard.

A team of people was sent to the yard in two tug boats and tried to board the ship. As informed, the subcontractors tried to unmoor the vessel and tow it to another location where it would be completed.

The attempt was, however, thwarted by the shipyard’s workers at around midnight, September 20, who called to police to intervene in the matter.

DEME is said to be in talks with the Spanish yard on the possible solution of the matter, but legal action against the cash-strapped shipbuilder has not been ruled out.

The ship is being built by the yard for Tidewater, part of DEME Group, and needs around six more months to be completed.

Living Stone, described by its owner as “the world’s most advanced” subsea cable installation and trenching vessel was launched at the Spanish shipyard on September 18, 2016.

The vessel features a Dynamic Positioning 3 capability and dual fuel engines, with LNG being its prime fuel.

The ship was supposed to be delivered in the second quarter of 2017 and head to its first project at the Merkur offshore wind farm in Germany, 45 km north of Borkum in the North Sea, for the installation of inter-array cables.

Neither DEME nor LaNaval replied to World Maritime News with a comment on the matter.


World Maritime News Staff

 

Belgian dredging and marine engineering group DEME launched “the world’s most advanced” subsea cable installation and trenching vessel Living Stone at Spain’s LaNaval shipyard on September 18.


The cable installation vessel is equipped with two turntables below deck, each having a 5,000 tons cable capacity. Together the turntables can carry and transport more than 200 km of cable that can be installed in a single trip.

             

The ship’s deck space of 3,500 m2 facilitates a cable handling system with innovative and reliable cable handling tools for cable ends, connections and cable protection systems, DEME said.

Living Stone can also be equipped with a third carrousel above deck with an additional load capacity of 2,000 tons and a 600 tons crane.

A system developed in-house by Tideway enables the cable installation vessel “to install cables faster and more efficiently in longer lengths and with less offshore joints than any other cable installation vessel.”

To be deployed by DEME’s Dutch subsidiary Tideway, the vessel will serve transport and installation projects as well as offshore power cable installations.

Featuring a Dynamic Positioning 3 capability, the vessel has been designed as an environmentally friendly ship with dual fuel engines with LNG being its prime fuel.

Living Stone, which accommodate a crew of up to 100 persons, has a Green Passport and the Clean Design Notation awarded to owners and operators who choose to design and operate their vessels in an environmentally sustainable approach.

The vessel is scheduled to be delivered in the second quarter of 2017 and will head to its first project at the Merkur offshore wind farm in Germany, 45 km north of Borkum in the North Sea, for the installation of inter array cables.

 

 

 

 

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